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Author: FHI 360


Contraceptive Technology Innovation (CTI) Exchange

The Contraceptive Technology Innovation (CTI) Exchange is a platform for increasing global access to resources on contraceptive research, development, registration, and introduction through collaboration and knowledge sharing. The site features Calliope, the Contraceptive Pipeline Database, which provides information on new and future contraceptive products, including long-acting and novel products currently only available in limited markets.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360
Publication date: 2021

Tool Web page

Checklist for Screening Clients Who Want to Initiate DMPA (or NET-EN)

The DMPA/NET-EN checklist consists of questions designed to identify medical conditions that would prevent safe DMPA/NET-EN use or require further screening and assess whether a client might be pregnant. It also provides guidance and directions based on clients’ responses.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360
Publication date: June, 2017

Tool Checklist for Screening Clients Who Want to Initiate DMPA (or NET-EN)

Provision of Injectable Contraceptives within Drug Shops: A Promising Approach for Increasing Access and Method Choice

This 4-page brief is focused on the use of drug shops to increase access to injectable contraceptives.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360, JSI, Inc., USAID
Publication date: June, 2014

Brief Web page

Key Indicators for Community-based Access to Injectable Contraception Pilot Studies

An indicator is a measure of program performance that is tracked over time. This document presents potential process and outcome indicators organized according to the phase of the community-based access to injectables (CBA2I) pilot along with the related evaluation questions, data sources and measurement tools. The list can be adapted to local contexts and program goals to assess a pilot’s progress toward intended outputs and achievement of goals.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360
Publication date: July, 2011

Community-Based Health Workers Can Safely and Effectively Administer Injectable Contraceptives: Conclusions from a Technical Consultation

This brief presents the conclusions of a technical consultation of experts that reviewed extensive evidence and recommended that community-based provision of injectable contraceptives by trained community health workers is safe and effective. The document highlights program guidance and operational issues as well as priorities for new research.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360
Publication date: June, 2010

Report Community-Based Health Workers Can Safely and Effectively Administer Injectable Contraceptives: Conclusions from a Technical Consultation

The Highs, Lows, and Squishy Middle of Contraceptive Product Introduction

As part of the Global Health Science and Practice (GHTechX) conference, CHAI, FHI 360, PATH, the Population Council, PSI, and WCG hosted an April 22, 2021 session to synthesize lessons learned across contraceptive introduction of implants, DMPA-SC self-injection, hormonal IUS and other methods. During the session, experts from Kenya, Madagascar, Uganda, and the United States outlined essential steps for the process of contraceptive product introduction, described common challenges, and shared tools and approaches based on experiences with the three methods. Session slides are available below. To watch the recording of this and many other sessions, register for free on the GHTechX website.

Institutional Author(s): Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI), FHI 360, PATH, Population Council
Publication date: April, 2021

Adolescent and covert family planning users’ experiences self-injecting contraception in Uganda and Malawi: implications for waste disposal of subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate

Self-administered subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-SC) is poised to increase access to contraception; however, governments are concerned about the waste management of used units. Self-injectors in Malawi and Uganda are currently instructed to store used units in containers and return them to health workers for disposal. However, this may not be feasible in low-resource settings, especially for younger or covert self-injectors. We describe adolescent (15–19 years) and adult (20–49 years) self-injectors’ disposal experiences in Uganda and Malawi. When possible, we compare covert and overt users’ experiences.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360
Individual Author(s): Holly M Burke, Catherine Packer, Laura Wando, Symon Peter Wandiembe, Nelson Muwereza, Subarna Pradhan, Akuzike Zingani, Bagrey Ngwira
Publication date: August, 2020

Journal Article Adolescent and covert family planning users’ experiences self-injecting contraception in Uganda and Malawi: implications for waste disposal of subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate

Family planning provision in pharmacies and drug shops: an urgent prescription

Drug shops and pharmacies have long been recognized as the first point of contact for health care in developing countries, including family planning (FP) services. Drug shop operators and pharmacists should not be viewed as mere merchants of short-acting contraceptive methods, as this ignores their capacity for increasing uptake of FP services and methods in a systematic and collaborative way with the public sector, social marketing groups and product distributors. We draw on lessons learned from the rich experience of earlier efforts to promote a variety of public health interventions in pharmacies and drug shops. To integrate this setting that provides convenience, confidentiality, access to user-controlled contraceptive methods (i.e., pills, condoms and potentially Sayana Press®) and a gateway to clinic-based FP services, we propose three promising practices that should be encouraged in future interventions to increase access to quality FP services.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360
Individual Author(s): Dawn S. Chin-Quee, John Stanback, Tracy Orr
Publication date: August, 2018

Journal Article Link to Journal Article

Community-Based Access to Injectable Contraceptives (CBA2I): Select Resources

Community-based access to injectable contraceptives (CBA2I) is an important strategy for addressing the reproductive health needs of women and couples wishing to limit or space pregnancies. The resources in this list aim to help stakeholders effectively implement CBA2I programs.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360
Publication date: June, 2018

Community-Based Access to Injectable Contraceptives (CBA2I): Select Resources

Women’s satisfaction, use, storage and disposal of subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-SC) during a randomized trial

To describe women’s experiences with subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-SC) to inform scale-up of self-administered DMPA-SC. We conducted a 12-month randomized controlled trial in Malawi to measure DMPA-SC continuation rates. A total of 731 women presenting at six Ministry of Health clinics or to community health workers (CHWs) in rural communities were randomized to receive DMPA-SC administered by a provider or be trained to self-inject DMPA-SC. Data collectors contacted women after the reinjection window at 3, 6 and 9 months to collect data on satisfaction and use; self-injectors were also queried about storage and disposal of DMPA-SC. We compared frequencies of injection experiences and satisfaction by study group and over time.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360, College of Medicine, University of Malawi
Individual Author(s): Holly M Burke, Mario Chen, Mercy Buluzi, Rachael Fuchs, Silver Wevill, Lalitha Venkatasubramanian, Leila Dal Santo, Bagrey Ngwira
Publication date: May, 2018

Journal Article Link to Journal Article