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Author: Fredrick Mubiru


Using Human-Centered Design to Explore Potential Users’ and Men’s Views of New Injectable Contraceptives in Kampala and Lagos

Background: Injectable contraceptives are the most used method in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted market research to assess potential user attitudes toward 4- and 6-month injectables. We also present user suggestions for marketing these new injectables once they are available.

Methods: We implemented a 2-phase market research study from October through December 2021 in Kampala, Uganda, and Lagos, Nigeria. We conducted 11 focus group discussions (FGDs) with 51 participants in Kampala and 12 FGDs with 67 participants in Lagos. FGDs included current and potential injectable users and men stratified by marital status and age. Next, 23 women in Kampala and 24 in Lagos participated in cocreation workshops using human-centered design methods to explore marketing and communications strategies for each injectable. Data collection teams completed semistructured data extraction tables that were then analyzed thematically.

Results: Participants liked both injectable options due to the reduced number of facility visits that would save time and money and increase privacy. Primary concerns included side effects, delayed return to fertility, cost, self-efficacy to self-inject, and stock-outs. Participants in Kampala preferred a shorter reinjection window (or “grace period”) because it is easier to remember and they assumed it meant a quicker return to fertility, but participants in Lagos preferred a longer window because it provides extra time for reinjection. Citing norms around women needing to get pregnant quickly after marriage, participants in both sites felt that the 4-month injectable would benefit young people with busy lifestyles or limited access to facilities, whereas the 6-month injectable would benefit women who already had children.

Conclusions: We found that participants in Kampala and Lagos would prefer additional injectable options to meet the wide-ranging needs of users in different stages of their reproductive lives. Family planning program planners can apply the marketing insights we identified when these new injectables become available.

Institutional author(s): FHI 360
Individual author(s): Holly M Burke, Rebecca Callahan, Anna Lawton, Abigail Turinayo, Oluwatoyin Oyekenu, Sheila Niyonsaba, Oladunni Taiwo, Victor Muwonge Semaganda, Andy Awiti, Audrey Fratus, Fredrick Mubiru, Funmilola OlaOlorun
Publication date: December, 2023

Journal article Global Health: Science and Practice

Continuation of subcutaneous or intramuscular injectable contraception when administered by facility-based and community health workers: findings from a prospective cohort study in Burkina Faso and Uganda

The aim of this study was to examine continuation of subcutaneous and intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-SC and DMPA-IM) when administered by facility-based health workers in Burkina Faso and Village Health Teams (VHTs) in Uganda. Participants were family planning clients of health centers (Burkina Faso) or VHTs (Uganda) who had decided to initiate injectable use. Women selected DMPA-SC or DMPA-IM and study staff followed them for up to four injections (providing 12 months of pregnancy protection) to determine contraceptive continuation. Study staff interviewed women at their first injection (baseline), second injection, fourth injection and if they discontinued either product.

Institutional author(s): PATH, Makerere University, Institut Africain de Santé Publique (IASP), Institut Supérieur des Sciences de la Population, Centre MURAZ, FHI 360, Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Santé (IRSS)
Individual author(s): Ellen MacLachlan, Lynn Atuyambe, Tieba Millogo, Georges Guiella, Seydou Yaro, Simon Kasasa, Justine Bukenya, Agnes Nyabigambo, Fredrick Mubiru, Justine Tumusiime, Yentéma Onadja, Lonkila Moussa Zan, Clarisse Goeum/Sanon, Seni Kouanda, Allen Namagembe
Publication date: August, 2018

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