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The Highs, Lows, and Squishy Middle of Contraceptive Product Introduction

As part of the Global Health Science and Practice (GHTechX) conference, CHAI, FHI 360, PATH, the Population Council, PSI, and WCG hosted an April 22, 2021 session to synthesize lessons learned across contraceptive introduction of implants, DMPA-SC self-injection, hormonal IUS and other methods. During the session, experts from Kenya, Madagascar, Uganda, and the United States outlined essential steps for the process of contraceptive product introduction, described common challenges, and shared tools and approaches based on experiences with the three methods. Session slides are available below. To watch the recording of this and many other sessions, register for free on the GHTechX website.

Institutional Author(s): Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI), FHI 360, PATH, Population Council
Publication date: April, 2021

Evidence at-a-glance: What we know about subcutaneous DMPA, a new type of injectable contraception

This brief outlines existing evidence on DMPA-SC with data grouped into top-line, evidence-based messages, with corresponding data from different countries. This handout can be printed and distributed directly to decision-makers. It contains several one-page spotlight handouts on specific sub-topics, which can be printed and paired with the two-page summary—for distribution to decision-makers—as needed.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: October, 2019

Costs and cost-effectiveness of subcutaneous DMPA through different delivery channels: What new evidence tells us

This brief summarizes recent evidence from African countries on the costs and cost-effectiveness of DMPA-SC. Key findings include that DMPA-SC may help reduce service delivery costs by catalyzing expansion of channels closest to women and that self-injected DMPA-SC is cost-saving as compared to clinic-administered DMPA-IM when accounting for costs to women and health systems.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: October, 2019

Subcutaneous DMPA key facts: Answering questions and dispelling common myths about a new type of injectable contraception

This brief offers concise, evidence-based information to help answer common questions and dispel myths about injectable contraception. Myths are not stated directly because repeating a myth may reinforce it in people’s minds.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: October, 2019

PowerPoint template: Expanding options and access with subcutaneous DMPA, a new type of injectable contraception

This customizable slide deck provides a brief description of DMPA-SC and its benefits; an overview of evidence on how the product expands access through multiple delivery channels; and illustrative policy and advocacy gaps and recommendations for country decision-makers.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: October, 2019

Contraceptive eligibility for women at high risk of HIV

The World Health Organization (WHO) convened a Guideline Development Group (GDG) meeting from 29 to 31 July 2019 to review global guidance on contraceptive eligibility for women at high risk of HIV acquisition to and determine whether revisions to the fifth edition of the Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use (MEC) were needed. The issue was deemed critical, particularly for sub-Saharan Africa, given the high lifetime risk of acquiring HIV alongside the importance of hormonal contraception in offering women and adolescent girls’ choice and in reducing their risk of unintended pregnancy, a common threat to the health, well-being and lives of women and adolescent girls.

Institutional Author(s): World Health Organization (WHO)
Publication date: August, 2019

New App for WHO’s Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use

The WHO has launched an App for its Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. This digital tool will facilitate the task of family planning providers in recommending safe, effective and acceptable contraception methods for women with medical conditions or medically-relevant characteristics.

Institutional Author(s): World Health Organization (WHO)
Publication date: August, 2019

Tool Link to Press Briefing

Association Between the Quality of Contraceptive Counseling and Method Continuation: Findings From a Prospective Cohort Study in Social Franchise Clinics in Pakistan and Uganda

Quality of family planning counseling is likely associated with whether or not women continue to use the same contraceptive method over time. The Method Information Index (MII) is a widely available measure of contraceptive counseling quality but little is known about its association with rates of method continuation. Using data from a prospective cohort study of 1,998 social franchise clients in Pakistan and Uganda, we investigated the relationship between reported baseline MII and the risk of method continuation over 12 months using survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. Higher scores on the 3-question Method Information Index (MII)—measuring client-reported receipt of contraceptive information—was associated with continued use of family planning over 12 months. We recommend incorporating use of the MII in routine assessments of family planning service quality.

Global Health: Science and Practice. March 2019, 7(1):87-102. https://doi.org/10.9745/GHSP-D-18-00407

 

Institutional Author(s): Metrics for Management, Population Council, Wilfrid Laurier University, Population Services International (PSI), MSI Reproductive Choices, Makerere University
Individual Author(s): Nirali M. Chakraborty, Karen Chang, Benjamin Bellows, Karen A. Grépin, Waqas Hameed, Amanda Kalamar, Xaher Gul, Lynn Atuyambe, Dominic Montagu
Publication date: March, 2019

Journal Article Association Between the Quality of Contraceptive Counseling and Method Continuation: Findings From a Prospective Cohort Study in Social Franchise Clinics in Pakistan and Uganda

Family planning provision in pharmacies and drug shops: an urgent prescription

Drug shops and pharmacies have long been recognized as the first point of contact for health care in developing countries, including family planning (FP) services. Drug shop operators and pharmacists should not be viewed as mere merchants of short-acting contraceptive methods, as this ignores their capacity for increasing uptake of FP services and methods in a systematic and collaborative way with the public sector, social marketing groups and product distributors. We draw on lessons learned from the rich experience of earlier efforts to promote a variety of public health interventions in pharmacies and drug shops. To integrate this setting that provides convenience, confidentiality, access to user-controlled contraceptive methods (i.e., pills, condoms and potentially Sayana Press®) and a gateway to clinic-based FP services, we propose three promising practices that should be encouraged in future interventions to increase access to quality FP services.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360
Individual Author(s): Dawn S. Chin-Quee, John Stanback, Tracy Orr
Publication date: August, 2018

Journal Article Link to Journal Article

Toolkit for the Implementation Guide for the Medical Eligibility Criteria and Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use Guidelines

The Implementation Guide for the Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use (MEC) and Selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use (SPR) is part of a global initiative to translate guidance into practice, through implementation science principles. The Implementation Guide is designed to provide a structured process to aid countries’ efforts to incorporate the World Health Organization Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use (MEC) and Selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use (SPR) (and their updates) into national family planning guidance. The Toolkit provides the practical resources needed to achieve the tasks in the Implementation Guide.

Institutional Author(s): World Health Organization (WHO)
Publication date: 2018