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Tag: acceptability


Self-injected subcutaneous DMPA: A new frontier in advancing contraceptive access and use for women

This brief details the strong body of evidence and experience with self-injection of DMPA-SC in low-resource settings, including how the practice can reduce access-related barriers, improve contraceptive continuation, and enhance women’s autonomy.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: October, 2019

Resources: A list of references about subcutaneous DMPA

This brief lists key references and resources from the evidence base on DMPA-SC. Pair this with the Evidence at-a-glance brief if your target decision-maker would like to have access to the data in that handout.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: October, 2019

Evidence at-a-glance: What we know about subcutaneous DMPA, a new type of injectable contraception

This brief outlines existing evidence on DMPA-SC with data grouped into top-line, evidence-based messages, with corresponding data from different countries. This handout can be printed and distributed directly to decision-makers. It contains several one-page spotlight handouts on specific sub-topics, which can be printed and paired with the two-page summary—for distribution to decision-makers—as needed.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: October, 2019

Acceptability of the distribution of DMPA-SC by community health workers among acceptors in the rural province of Lualaba in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: a pilot study

The objective of this research is to assess the acceptability of the provision of subcutaneously administered depo medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-SC) by nonclinically trained community health workers (CHWs) among acceptors in the rural province of Lualaba in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).In 2017, 34 CHWs received training in provision of DMPA-SC. Among other methods, DMPA-SC by CHWs was offered during household visits and at community outreach events. The initial survey included questions on acceptors’ demographic characteristics, contraceptive use history and experience with provision of DMPA-SC by a CHW. The follow-up included questions about side effects experienced and continuation of DMPA-SC by a CHW. Seventy-four percent of initial acceptors of DMPA-SC (N=252) were first-time contraception users. Almost all (96.0%) felt very comfortable with a CHW performing the injection rather than a physician or nurse, and 97.6% perceived that the CHW was very comfortable performing the injection. A total of 239 women were interviewed at follow-up. Most expressed satisfaction with the method despite some side effects experienced. Almost all acceptors (97.9%) were satisfied with the information provided by CHWs, and 93.8% were satisfied with the overall service. Most (96.4%) would choose to continue receiving DMPA-SC by a CHW rather than in a health clinic, and 95.2% would recommend DMPA-SC by a CHW to a friend. Overall, administration of DMPA-SC by CHWs is acceptable to users in Lualaba. DMPA-SC can be safely provided within the community after proper training. This study validates the use of CHWs (without clinical training) to provide DMPA-SC in a rural sub-Saharan African setting. It also represents an important step in obtaining official MOH authorization for the scale-up of this mechanism of distribution to other underserved regions in the DRC.

Institutional Author(s): École de Santé Publique de Lubumbashi, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, l'Univers Santé Plus, Pathfinder International
Individual Author(s): Albert Mwembo, Rebecca Emel, Tesky Koba, Jacqueline Bapura Sankoko, Aben Ngay, Rianne Gay, Jane T Bertrand
Publication date: August, 2018

Journal Article Link to Journal Article

Self-Injection Feasibility and Acceptability

This brief provides an overview of PATH’s research studies assessing the feasibility and acceptability of self-injection in Uganda and Senegal.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: January, 2018

Brief Self-Injection Feasibility and Acceptability

Acceptability of depo-subQ in Uniject

FHI 360’s PROGRESS project worked with ministries of health and local partners in Senegal and Uganda to conduct an acceptability study of the subcutaneous delivery of injectable contraceptives with the Uniject™ device (DMPA-SC, Sayana® Press). The study assessed acceptability among family planning clients and providers, including community health workers, and offered recommendations for the introduction of this method.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360
Publication date: June, 2013