Skip to main content

Use the controls below to filter resources by category, search for words or phrases, or filter by multiple attributes including category, format, author and more.

Tag: Senegal


Building capacity through digital approaches: Can eLearning replace in-person training?

Using eLearning to train health workers on family planning counseling can be an effective training approach, particularly when carefully planned and coordinated to maximize the benefits. On August 26, 2021, the DMPA-SC Access Collaborative hosted this webinar on eLearning for health workers learning to counsel clients on DMPA-SC self-injection in Senegal and Uganda. During the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, this approach was launched and evaluated in four regions of Senegal and four districts in Uganda.

The findings and recommendations from the experiences in Senegal and Uganda may offer lessons for other countries wishing to implement digital learning approaches. The webinar presenters raised important considerations about stakeholder coordination, internet and technology access, eLearning platforms, establishing training targets, training content, and the important role of post-training supervision.

Institutional Author(s): PATH, JSI, Inc.
Publication date: August, 2021

Looking back, thinking forward, and scaling up: Insights from the DMPA-SC Access Collaborative

The DMPA-SC Access Collaborative hosted this April 21, 2021 webinar highlighting lessons learned to date through four years of data-driven technical assistance and coordination to ensure that women have increased access to self-injection as a contraceptive option, delivered through informed choice programming. The discussion focused on key topics for the introduction and scale-up of self-injection—and self-care interventions more broadly—at the country level including:

  • Policy and advocacy for new product introduction.
  • How to coordinate scale-up of a new product.
  • Using data to inform program introduction and scale-up.
  • Effective innovations and adaptations in provider training.

This discussion was moderated by Monica Mutesa, Zambia Country Coordinator, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, PATH. Speakers included:

  • Caitlin Corneliess, Project Director, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, PATH
  • Adewole Adefalu, Nigeria Country Coordinator, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, JSI
  • Allen Namagembe, Uganda Deputy Director, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, PATH
  • Avotiana Rakotomanga, Madagascar Country Coordinator, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, JSI
  • Alain Kabore, Regional Technical Advisor, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, PATH

For more information, please contact FPoptions@path.org.

Institutional Author(s): PATH, JSI, Inc.
Publication date: April, 2021

How to Introduce and Scale Up DMPA-SC: Practical Guidance from PATH Based on Lessons Learned During Pilot Introduction

This document was created to support ministry of health and nongovernmental partners as they develop strategies to introduce and scale up subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA-SC, brand name Sayana® Press) to increase contraceptive options and access. Available in English and French, the publication provides practical guidance based on results, evidence, and learning from the pilot introductions of DMPA-SC in four countries in Africa.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: 2020

DMPA-SC country data dashboard

The country dashboard is a visual presentation of key data for a select list of priority countries; it provides a snapshot of the state and stage of DMPA-SC introduction/scale-up, allowing stakeholders to assess progress, identify roadblocks, guide course corrections, and inform decisions.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: August, 2020

Designing a global monitoring system for pilot introduction of a new contraceptive technology, subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA-SC)

In collaboration with ministries of health, PATH and key partners launched the first pilot introductions of subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-SC, brand name Sayana® Press) in Burkina Faso, Niger, Senegal, and Uganda from July 2014 through June 2016. While each country implemented a unique introduction strategy, all agreed to track a set of uniform indicators to chart the effect of introducing this new method across settings. Existing national health information systems (HIS) were unable to track new methods or delivery channels introduced for a pilot, thus were not a feasible source for project data. We successfully monitored the four-country pilot introductions by implementing a four-phase approach: 1) developing and defining global indicators, 2) integrating indicators into existing country data collection tools, 3) facilitating consistent reporting and data management, and 4) analyzing and interpreting data and sharing results. Project partners leveraged existing family planning registers to the extent possible, and introduced new or modified data collection and reporting tools to generate project-specific data where necessary. We routinely shared monitoring results with global and national stakeholders, informing decisions about future investments in the product and scale up of DMPA-SC nationwide. Our process and lessons learned may provide insights for countries planning to introduce DMPA-SC or other new contraceptive methods in settings where stakeholder expectations for measurable results for decision-making are high.

Institutional Author(s): PATH, UNFPA
Individual Author(s): Anna Stout, Siri Wood, Allen Namagembe, Alain Kaboré, Daouda Siddo, Ida Ndione
Publication date: June, 2018

Costs of administering injectable contraceptives through health workers and self-injection: evidence from Burkina Faso, Uganda, and Senegal

To evaluate the 12-month total direct costs (medical and nonmedical) of delivering subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-SC) under three strategies – facility-based administration, community-based administration and self-injection – compared to the costs of delivering intramuscular DMPA (DMPA-IM) via facility- and community-based administration. We conducted four cross-sectional microcosting studies in three countries from December 2015 to January 2017. We estimated direct medical costs (i.e., costs to health systems) using primary data collected from 95 health facilities on the resources used for injectable contraceptive service delivery. For self-injection, we included both costs of the actual research intervention and adjusted programmatic costs reflecting a lower-cost training aid. Direct nonmedical costs (i.e., client travel and time costs) came from client interviews conducted during injectable continuation studies. All costs were estimated for one couple year of protection. One-way sensitivity analyses identified the largest cost drivers.

Institutional Author(s): PATH, Institut de Recherche en Sciences et de la Santé, University of Washington
Individual Author(s): Laura Di Giorgio, Mercy Mvundura, Justine Tumusiime, Allen Namagembe, Amadou Ba, Danielle Belemsaga-Yugbare, Chloe Morozoff, Elizabeth Brouwer, Marguerite Ndour, Jennifer Kidwell Drake
Publication date: May, 2018

Expanding Access to Injectable Contraception: Results From Pilot Introduction of Subcutaneous Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (DMPA-SC) in 4 African Countries

PATH partnered with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and country ministries of health (MOHs) to coordinate pilot introductions of subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (subcutaneous DMPA or DMPA-SC, brand name Sayana Press) in Burkina Faso, Niger, Senegal, and Uganda from July 2014 through June 2016 in order to expand the range of methods available to women, particularly in remote locations. The pilot introductions aimed to answer key questions that would inform decisions about future investments in DMPA-SC and scaling up product availability and service-delivery innovations nationally. These questions included the extent to which DMPA-SC would appeal to first-time users of modern contraception, as well as adolescent girls and young women; whether DMPA-SC would add value to family planning programs or simply replace DMPA-IM or other modern methods; and the trends in injectables use when introducing DMPA-SC (or any injectable) at the community level for the first time. We implemented a multi-country monitoring system to track key indicators, including the number of doses administered by category of user (e.g., new users, by client age group) or delivery channel. Providers generally collected these data using their national programs’ standard family planning registers. Data were analyzed for cumulative information and to examine trends over time using Microsoft Power Query for Excel and Tableau. Across the 4 countries, nearly half a million DMPA-SC doses were administered and approximately 135,000 first-time users of modern contraception were reached. Furthermore, 44% of the doses administered in 3 of the countries with data were to adolescent girls and young women under age 25. Switching from DMPA-IM to DMPA-SC was not widespread, ranging from 7% in Burkina Faso to 16% in Uganda. Results from these pilot introductions demonstrate that DMPA-SC has the potential to expand community-level access to injectables, maximize task-sharing strategies, and reach young women and new acceptors of family planning. Considered within the context of each country’s setting, training approach, and introduction strategy, these results can help stakeholders in other countries make informed decisions about whether and how to include this contraceptive option in their family planning programs.

Institutional Author(s): PATH, UNFPA
Individual Author(s): Anna Stout, Siri Wood, George Barigye, Alain Kaboré, Daouda Siddo, Ida Ndione
Publication date: March, 2018

Monitoring the introduction of DMPA-SC

From 2014 to 2016, PATH coordinated pilot introduction of the injectable contraceptive subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA-SC, brand name Sayana® Press) in Burkina Faso, Niger, Senegal, and Uganda. These materials feature guidance for monitoring DMPA-SC introductions, monitoring results, and lessons learned, which can help inform contraceptive introduction programming for DMPA-SC and other methods.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: March, 2018

Self-Injection Feasibility and Acceptability

This brief provides an overview of PATH’s research studies assessing the feasibility and acceptability of self-injection in Uganda and Senegal.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: January, 2018

Brief Self-Injection Feasibility and Acceptability

Country stakeholder interview reports on DMPA-SC self-injection

Prior to implementing the first DMPA-SC self-injection studies in sub-Saharan Africa, PATH conducted in-depth interviews with key family planning stakeholders in Burkina Faso, Niger, Senegal, and Uganda from 2014 to 2016. These interviews covered perceived benefits, challenges, and research needs for self-injection.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: 2017