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Tag: Uganda


DMPA-SC Access Collaborative country briefs

The DMPA-SC Access Collaborative has published a collection of briefs on countries where we have provided focused technical assistance between 2017 and 2021. This includes the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda, and Zambia. Each brief describes the country’s introduction and scale-up experiences for DMPA-SC and self-injection, including accomplishments, challenges, innovations, key lessons, factors for success, and plans for the way forward.

 

Institutional Author(s): PATH, JSI, Inc.
Publication date: 2021

Building capacity through digital approaches: Can eLearning replace in-person training?

Using eLearning to train health workers on family planning counseling can be an effective training approach, particularly when carefully planned and coordinated to maximize the benefits. On August 26, 2021, the DMPA-SC Access Collaborative hosted this webinar on eLearning for health workers learning to counsel clients on DMPA-SC including self-injection in Senegal and Uganda. During 2019-2020, this approach was launched and evaluated in four regions of Senegal and four districts in Uganda.

The findings and recommendations from the experiences in Senegal and Uganda may offer lessons for other countries wishing to implement digital learning approaches. The webinar presenters raised important considerations about stakeholder coordination, internet and technology access, eLearning platforms, establishing training targets, training content, and the important role of post-training supervision.

Institutional Author(s): PATH, JSI, Inc.
Publication date: August, 2021

Video

Looking back, thinking forward, and scaling up: Insights from the DMPA-SC Access Collaborative

The DMPA-SC Access Collaborative hosted this April 21, 2021 webinar highlighting lessons learned to date through four years of data-driven technical assistance and coordination to ensure that women have increased access to self-injection as a contraceptive option, delivered through informed choice programming. The discussion focused on key topics for the introduction and scale-up of self-injection—and self-care interventions more broadly—at the country level including:

  • Policy and advocacy for new product introduction.
  • How to coordinate scale-up of a new product.
  • Using data to inform program introduction and scale-up.
  • Effective innovations and adaptations in provider training.

This discussion was moderated by Monica Mutesa, Zambia Country Coordinator, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, PATH. Speakers included:

  • Caitlin Corneliess, Project Director, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, PATH
  • Adewole Adefalu, Nigeria Country Coordinator, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, JSI
  • Allen Namagembe, Uganda Deputy Director, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, PATH
  • Avotiana Rakotomanga, Madagascar Country Coordinator, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, JSI
  • Alain Kabore, Regional Technical Advisor, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, PATH

For more information, please contact FPoptions@path.org.

Institutional Author(s): PATH, JSI, Inc.
Publication date: April, 2021

Training supply recommendations for DMPA-SC rollout

DMPA-SC is a three-month injectable contraceptive that is easy to use and uniquely suited for self-injection. Demonstration and practice injections are a key part of training programs for both health workers and self-injection clients. Based on lessons learned in five countries, this memo summarizes PATH’s recommendations regarding devices for injection demonstration and practice, injection practice models, and waste disposal.

Institutional Author(s): PATH
Publication date: March, 2022

Self-injection in the private sector: Promoting policies for progress

The private sector holds great potential to reduce unmet need for family planning, and many countries are poised to adopt a total market approach for increasing contraceptive access through private pharmacies and drug shops. Policies supporting scale-up of family planning service provision and expanding method options such as DMPA-SC self-injection, must be prioritized in these entities.

The PATH-JSI DMPA-SC Access Collaborative and partners have gained valuable insights with relevance to private sector engagement on self-injection. This webinar held February 15, 2022 highlighted lessons learnt, challenges, recommendations, and considerations for policies supporting private sector engagement in self-injection in different country contexts. Specific topics included:

  • Financing and commodity production ecosystems
  • Procurement and supply chains
  • Service delivery and programming
  • Data reporting and monitoring
  • Advocacy
  • Demand generation

The discussion was moderated by Allen Namagembe, Deputy Project Director, Uganda DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, PATH.

Panelists:

  • Dr. Kayode Afolabi, Director and Head, Reproductive Health Division, Federal Ministry of Health, Nigeria
  • Dr. Daniella Munene, Member, National Executive Committee, Pharmaceutical Society of Kenya
  • Dr. Hortense Randrianaivo, President, Association of Pharmacists of Madagascar
  • Mr. Célestin Compaore, Regional Project Director, DMPA-SC, Jhpiego, Burkina Faso

Institutional Author(s): PATH, JSI, Inc., Jhpiego, Nigeria Federal Ministry of Health, Pharmaceutical Society of Kenya, Association of Pharmacists of Madagascar
Publication date: February, 2022

DMPA-SC integration in preservice training: Lessons from Uganda

Updating family planning and reproductive health preservice training is an important approach to make an impact on the health workforce and foster successful programs. In 2021, the DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, in collaboration with Uganda’s Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education and Sports, conducted a regional training for clinical and health training institutions on the topic of DMPA-SC including self-injection. This training integrated DMPA-SC content into the health provider preservice curriculum, trained tutors, and helped advance national scale-up of self-injection. As a result, 92 Ugandan health training institutions included self-injection content in their preservice curriculum for nurses, midwives, and clinical officers, and 190 tutors were trained—which will help ensure training of many more providers in the future.

During this process, the Access Collaborative gained valuable insights with relevance to other country contexts. This webinar held on January 27, 2022 highlighted lessons learnt, challenges, recommendations, and considerations for the inclusion of self-injection content in provider preservice training. In the Ugandan context, these include:

  • How inclusion of self-injection in preservice training can help reach FP2030 country commitments.
  • Virtual preservice training approaches during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Costs for the inclusion of self-injection in preservice training.
  • The role of regulators and the Ministry of Health in ensuring availability of DMPA-SC for preservice training.

Institutional Author(s): PATH, JSI, Inc.
Publication date: January, 2022

Can DMPA-SC Self-injection Bridge a Family Planning Access Gap in Humanitarian Settings?

Humanitarian crises and disease outbreaks exacerbate the barriers that women face when seeking reproductive health services. They also highlight a timeless truth: women must be able to manage their own sexual and reproductive health—especially in a crisis when health systems are at their weakest.

On November 17, 2021, the PATH-JSI DMPA-SC Access Collaborative hosted this webinar on making self-care interventions available, including DMPA-SC self-injection, in humanitarian settings. Through this virtual discussion, we addressed key challenges in humanitarian settings that need to be addressed in order to leverage the potential of self-injection as an option to ease access to family planning in the context of a full method mix.

Discussion highlights included:

  • Programmatic or regulatory actions that need to be implemented
  • Country-specific cultural barriers affecting demand generation in humanitarian settings
  • Supply systems and processes in humanitarian settings compared to national systems
  • Collaboration and data sharing between agencies

This discussion was moderated by George Barigye, Regional Technical Advisor, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, PATH, Uganda. The keynote introduction was given by Dr. Adewole Adefalu, Country Coordinator, DMPA-SC Access Collaborative, JSI, Nigeria.

Featured panelists:

  • Lilian Ndinda, Maternal and Child Health Coordinator, International Rescue Committee, South Sudan
  • Dr. Arsenia Nhancale, Program Analyst, Family Planning and HIV, United Nations Population Fund, Mozambique
  • Dr. Ronald Nyakoojo, Assistant Public Health Officer, Reproductive Health/HIV, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Uganda
  • Roselline Achola, National Programme Analyst, Family Planning, United Nations Population Fund, Uganda

This discussion encouraged all stakeholders—program implementers, researchers, government officials, health providers, and members of civil society—to consider humanitarian sector perspectives when advocating for policies that advance self-care behaviors and commodities essential to improving health outcomes in crisis settings.

Institutional Author(s): PATH, JSI, Inc.
Publication date: November, 2021

Insight synthesis report on DMPA-SC self-injection

This report distills more than a year of programmatic research findings, looking at self-injection from a user journey perspective to analyze what drives consumer and provider decisions and attitudes. It reflects the unique perspectives of DMPA-SC self-injection early adopters and prospective users across Uganda and Nigeria. The report outlines how women perceive their own power, what makes self-injection convenient for them, who they trust as partners in their de-medicalized contraceptive experience, and more.

Institutional Author(s): Population Services International (PSI)
Publication date: September, 2021

The Highs, Lows, and Squishy Middle of Contraceptive Product Introduction

As part of the Global Health Science and Practice (GHTechX) conference, CHAI, FHI 360, PATH, the Population Council, PSI, and WCG hosted an April 22, 2021 session to synthesize lessons learned across contraceptive introduction of implants, DMPA-SC self-injection, hormonal IUS and other methods. During the session, experts from Kenya, Madagascar, Uganda, and the United States outlined essential steps for the process of contraceptive product introduction, described common challenges, and shared tools and approaches based on experiences with the three methods. Session slides are available below. To watch the recording of this and many other sessions, register for free on the GHTechX website.

Institutional Author(s): Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI), FHI 360, PATH, Population Council
Publication date: April, 2021

Adolescent and covert family planning users’ experiences self-injecting contraception in Uganda and Malawi: implications for waste disposal of subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate

Self-administered subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-SC) is poised to increase access to contraception; however, governments are concerned about the waste management of used units. Self-injectors in Malawi and Uganda are currently instructed to store used units in containers and return them to health workers for disposal. However, this may not be feasible in low-resource settings, especially for younger or covert self-injectors. We describe adolescent (15–19 years) and adult (20–49 years) self-injectors’ disposal experiences in Uganda and Malawi. When possible, we compare covert and overt users’ experiences.

Institutional Author(s): FHI 360
Individual Author(s): Holly M Burke, Catherine Packer, Laura Wando, Symon Peter Wandiembe, Nelson Muwereza, Subarna Pradhan, Akuzike Zingani, Bagrey Ngwira
Publication date: August, 2020

Journal Article Adolescent and covert family planning users’ experiences self-injecting contraception in Uganda and Malawi: implications for waste disposal of subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate